The Resilience Space

The Resilience Space attempts to look realistically at working life and to laugh at every available opportunity. We do this through our Surviving Work blog and social media, Surviving Work Library, online learning, training and face to face events.

 

In October 2016 we launched Surviving Work in Healthcare – an online resource for people working on the frontline of health services in partnership with the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust.

 

Surviving Work uses ideas from different disciplines including psychoanalysis, employment relations, and active learning methods – nothing new just the good solid stuff of talking, listening, thinking and solidarity in action. We take as given that we are all adults with ordinary expertise in life which when collectivised is powerful stuff.

 

We call this the LAUGH approach which involves three steps:

Stage 1: Starting where you are by Listening and Assessing what is going on at work

Stage 2: Understanding your environment and identifying resources that you have individually and collectively

Stage 3: Getting Help from the people around you and working out how to have better relationships at work

 

It will not make you richer or thinner but it will help you to survive work.

 

We are Anonymous

We will not give your details to anyone, at all. When you’re on the site you are anonymous and for that reason we recommend heartily that you use a personal email address. We want you to subscribe to our weekly blog and twitter with the confidence that you are our best kept secret.

 

 

 

About the Gaffer

Dr Elizabeth Cotton is a writer and educator working in the field of mental health at work. She teaches and writes academically about employment relations and precarious work, business and management, adult education, solidarity and team working, and mental health at work. Her background is as an organiser and trade union educator, having worked internationally for global trade unions in over 35 countries.

 

In 2017 Elizabeth will be publishing the results of the Surviving Work Survey – a national survey about working conditions in mental health services and opening up a public debate about the future of work in mental health.

 

Her new book Surviving Work in Healthcare: Helpful stuff for people on the frontline will be published by Rutledge in the Spring of 2017. You can contact Elizabeth on info@survivingwork.org.

 

 

 

Whether you actually are doing something you love or not, paid or unwaged, suited or booted, doing what’s necessary to keep yourself in work is a survival skill. It’s not as easy as it looks either, especially given the social no-no’s about openly admitting to struggling with work. And if you’re suffering to the extent that it’s actually affecting your mental health? Well, say the words “mental illness” out loud at work and it’s like you just farted in a lift.

 

The central objective of Surviving Work is to build our capacity to form good relationships with the people around us so that we can collectively build better workplaces.

Essentially we’re interested in how to make the best out of a bad lot.

 

What we do
Surviving work attempts to look realistically at working life and to laugh at every available opportunity. We do this through our blog and social media, Survival Guides, online learning and face to face events.

The Surviving Work Library is a free resource for working people on how to do it. It is filled to the brim with podcasts and top tips about how to survive work from the real experts (people who are actually doing it). From how to use anger to tackling bullying the library is full of honest and helpful stuff.

During 2012-2014 we developed and piloted short courses on juicy topics like bullying, how to manage people without losing your politics and how to protect yourself at work. These courses are now being delivered through the Tavistock Institute for Human Relations. Our current programmes are being delivered through the Tavistock Clinic, including a new course for NHS Guardians.

All of our activities are designed for front line workers and managers, taking a progressive and practical approach. We aim to cost our courses at a level where the non-executives amongst you can afford to come.

How we work
Surviving Work takes a jargon free, de-stigmatizing and practical approach for addressing the real problems of working life such as bullying and dealing with feelings of anger.

We use the LAUGH approach which helps us understand our working environments, to talk to each other and to solve problems collectively.

The LAUGH approach involves three steps:

Stage 1: Starting where you are by Listening and Assessing what is going on at work and what level of resilience you individually and collectively have

Stage 2: Understanding your environment and identifying resources

Stage 3: Getting Help from the people around you and working out how to have better relationships at work.

This model of education uses ideas from different disciplines like psychoanalysis, employment relations, management and active learning methods. LAUGH has been developed within academic and clinical networks including OPUS, ISPSO, Warwick University, Manchester University, London School of Economics, Birkbeck College, Ruskin College Oxford, Unison, NUT and Mind Cymru.

This website is about your heartbeat.  Even if you’re feeling OK, it’s a good idea to learn how to relax and controlling your pulse rate is an easy way of doing this.

First take your pulse. Count the number of beats in 10 seconds, multiply this number by 6 and you have your pulse rate. A normal heart rate should be 60-100 per minute.

Keeping your fingers on your pulse, try to reduce your rate.

You can do this by consciously lengthening the time you take for each breath, in and out.

At the same time use the relaxed firework on the website, which shows you visually what a relaxed pulse rate is like.

Animated background graphics: ‘I feel’ by Jonathan Hogg – a digital artwork commissioned by The Resilience Space.

Resilience is the voice that wakes you up to at 4am shouting “how am I going to get through this?”

 

Resilience doesn’t give you a diagnosis of mad or sane, it puts the human race moving a long a spectrum where some days we can cope and adapt to difficult situations and then other days we just can’t. It’s a pretty democratic idea that  all of us are resilient until we’re not.

 

The geeky research around resilience says that there are in life both resilience risks and protective factors. Risks include things like facing redundancy or numbing yourself by taking to the pop. Protective factors include things like learning and being good at your job but probably the thing that’s always likely to get you through is love.

 

Yes, call us hippies if you like, the key to resilience is other people. Most of our useful stuff introduces you to your own and other peoples’ humanity.

 

Start here at the Surviving Work Library. It won’t make you thinner or richer but it will help you fall in love with the human race.

 

Resilience is the voice that wakes you up to at 4am shouting “how am I going to get through this?”

 

Resilience doesn’t give you a diagnosis of mad or sane, it puts the human race moving a long a spectrum where some days we can cope and adapt to difficult situations and then other days we just can’t. It’s a pretty democratic idea that  all of us are resilient until we’re not.

 

The geeky research around resilience says that there are in life both resilience risks and protective factors. Risks include things like facing redundancy or numbing yourself by taking to the pop. Protective factors include things like learning and being good at your job but probably the thing that’s always likely to get you through is love.

 

Yes, call us hippies if you like, the key to resilience is other people. Most of our useful stuff introduces you to your own and other peoples’ humanity.

 

Start here at the Surviving Work Library. It won’t make you thinner or richer but it will help you fall in love with the human race.

 

Surviving Work

Surviving Work helpful stuff for human beings

Do you ever get sick of people trying to sell you the formula for success? While it would be lovely if we were all leaders and innovators, in these tough times options are limited. The only choice you might have for the time being (at least) is to get through the day the best way you can.

Whether you actually are doing something you love or not, paid or unwaged, suited or booted, doing what’s necessary to keep yourself in work is a survival skill. It’s not as easy as it looks either, especially given the social no-no’s about openly admitting to struggling with work. And if you’re suffering to the extent that it’s actually affecting your mental health? Well, say the words “mental illness” out loud at work and it’s like you just farted in a lift.

So let’s just spell out some harsh realities: we’re in the middle of long recession, everyone’s trying to get their head above water and learning a few new survival skills might come in handy…

The central objective of Surviving Work is to build our capacity to form good relationships with the people around us so that we can collectively build better workplaces.

Essentially we’re interested in how to make the best out of a bad lot.

 

What we do
Surviving work attempts to look realistically at working life and to laugh at every available opportunity. We do this through our blog and social media, Survival Guides, online learning and face to face events.

The Surviving Work Library is a free resource for working people on how to do it. It is filled to the brim with podcasts and top tips about how to survive work from the real experts (people who are actually doing it). From how to use anger to tackling bullying the library is full of honest and helpful stuff.

During 2012-2014 we developed and piloted short courses on juicy topics like bullying, how to manage people without losing your politics and how to protect yourself at work. These courses are now being delivered through the Tavistock Institute for Human Relations. Our current programmes are being delivered through the Tavistock Clinic, including a new course for NHS Guardians.

All of our activities are designed for front line workers and managers, taking a progressive and practical approach. We aim to cost our courses at a level where the non-executives amongst you can afford to come.

How we work
Surviving Work takes a jargon free, de-stigmatizing and practical approach for addressing the real problems of working life such as bullying and dealing with feelings of anger.

We use the LAUGH approach which helps us understand our working environments, to talk to each other and to solve problems collectively.

The LAUGH approach involves three steps:

Stage 1: Starting where you are by Listening and Assessing what is going on at work and what level of resilience you individually and collectively have

Stage 2: Understanding your environment and identifying resources

Stage 3: Getting Help from the people around you and working out how to have better relationships at work.

This model of education uses ideas from different disciplines like psychoanalysis, employment relations, management and active learning methods. LAUGH has been developed within academic and clinical networks including OPUS, ISPSO, Warwick University, Manchester University, London School of Economics, Birkbeck College, Ruskin College Oxford, Unison, NUT and Mind Cymru.